The Phillatelic Gems Informations(Informasi Koleksi filateli Langka di Dunia)

the phillatelic gems collections in the world information

1. usa phillatelic games

THE ALAN B. WHITMAN COLLECTION OF OUTSTANDING UNITED STATES STAMPS(January/2009)
Offered by Siegel Auction Galleries Inc. on January 27-28, 2008 – Sale 968.

 Lot 34
U$ 700,000.00

 Lot 66
U$ 200,000.00

 Lot 129
U$ 800,000,00

 Lot 34 – 5c Brick Red (27). Block of four, original gum, beautiful bright Brick Red color, incredibly well-centered for this difficult stamp, top left stamp insignificant small thin spot. Ex. Worthington, Hind, Sinkler and Ward. Illustrated in Linns Philatelic Gems II. With 1989 and 2000 P.F. certificates. Estimative: U$ 375,000.00. Price’s Hammer realized: U$ 700,000.00 + 15% buyer’s premium.

VERY FINE-EXTREMELY FINE. THIS IS THE ONLY RECORDED BLOCK OF THE 1857 5-CENT BRICK RED IN UNUSED CONDITION, WITH OR WITHOUT ORIGINAL GUM. TO BE THE MOST IMPORTANT PERFORATED 5-CENTJEFFERSONISSUE MULTIPLE.

This is the only intact block of the 5c Brick Red. The Caspary collection contained a block of three with a fourth stamp added to create a complete block. Neither Ryohei Ishikawa nor William H. Gross were able to secure the 5c Brick Red original-gum block for their fabulous Grand Prix award-winning collections. Apart from the block offered here, there are perhaps twenty 5c Brick Red stamps with original gum to be found among major auction sales of the past fifty years. About half of the known examples are poorly centered. Almost two-thirds have stains or small faults.

Lot 66 – 12c Intense Black, First Design (59). Original gum, lightly hinged, intense shade and detailed impression on crisp paper, unusually choice centering, two insignificant partly nibbed perforations at bottom not mentioned on any certificate. Ex. Lessmann, Hewitt and Concord. With 1971, 1984 and 2006 P.F. certificates. Estimative: US$ 75,000,00. Price’s Hammer realized: U$ 200,000.00 + 15% buyer’s premium.

THIS IS WITHOUT QUESTION ONE OF THE THREE FINEST OF THE FIFTEEN RECORDED EXAMPLES OF THE 12-CENT 1861 ISSUE FIRST DESIGN. ONLY THREE SOUND EXAMPLES ARE AVAILABLE WITH UNDISTURBED ORIGINAL GUM.

Lot 129 – 1c-30c 1875 Re-Issue of 1861-66 Issue (102-110). Blocks of four, original gum, deep rich colors and proof-like impressions, choice centering throughout, few trivial imperfections incl. 1c light crease at top right, 3c small thin spot at left, 15c faint horizontal natural gum bend at top. Ex Caspary, Lilly and Hetherington. The 1c with 1982 P.F. certificate. Others with 1968 P.F. certificates. Estimative: Estimative: US$ 316,500,00. Price’s Hammer realized: U$ 800,000.00 + 15% buyer’s premium.

THE UNIQUE SET OF 1861-66 RE-ISSUE BLOCKS OF FOUR, WHICH IS COMPLETE FROM THE ONE-CENT THRU THE 30-CENT (THE 90-CENT DOES NOT EXIST IN BLOCK FORM). SIX OF THESE BLOCKS ARE UNIQUE. THEY WERE HIGHLIGHTS OF THE CASPARY, LILLY AND HETHERINGTON COLLECTIONS, AND AS A GROUP FORM ONE OF THE GREATEST ASSEMBLAGES OF BLOCKS IN CLASSIC UNITED STATES PHILATELY.

Stamps from previous issues were made for the 1875 Centennial Exposition inPhiladelphia, and were intended both for sale and also to showcase examples of everyU.S.stamp printed to date. Stamps which were no longer valid for postage were called Reprints (those with original issue dates prior to demonetization — Scott Nos. 3, 4 and 40-47). Those still valid for postage were called Re-Issues. Those printed concurrently with contemporary designs were called Special Printings. The Post Office Department tried to get the original printing company to make them where possible; the Continental Bank Note Company printed Scott Nos. 40-47 and also Scott Nos. 167-177 and 180 and 181, while National Bank Note Company printed Nos. 102-111 and Nos. 123-132.

The 1861 Re-Issue and 1869 Pictorial Re-Issue were the only set of Reprints, Re-issues or Special Printings to be issued with original gum (both were done by the same printing company). The quality of the printing is very high — the colors are consistent, the impressions are uniformly superior, and the paper used is thicker and whiter than the original issued stamps. The design and perforations are exactly the same as the issued stamps. Perhaps the quality of the printing was an attempt to showcase their skills, to be considered for future stamp contracts. They were only available from the offices of the Third Assistant Postmaster General, who recorded the quantities purchased and the names of the purchasers. On July 23, 1884 the remaining stock was destroyed, by order of the Postmaster General.

The records for the 1861 Re-Issues are very comprehensive, and encompass hundreds of auction catalogues, as well as the Levi Records. The 3c, 5c, 10c, 12c, 24c and 30c blocks are unique. There are two blocks recorded for the 2c and 15c (the second of the latter with repaired perforations).

North-American Rarities offered by Siegel Auction Galleries Inc. on October 28-30, 2008.

   

 Lot 557
U$900,000.00

 Lot 1062
U$337,500.00

 Lot 828
U$ 375,000.00

Lot 557 – 3c Rose, B. Grill (82). Rich color in shade of 1868 printings, centered to upper left as are all four known examples, fancy cork cancel of Mason Tex. and part of red HAMBURG/20 3 69/FRANCO transit datestamp struck across lower left corner, which adds an element of color to this extraordinary stamp. 2008 Philatelic Foundation certificate for this single. Estimative: U$ 240,000.00. Price’s hammer realized: U$ 900,000.00 + 15% buyer’s premium.

THIS IS ONE OF THE FOUR 3-CENT B GRILL STAMPS DISCOVERED TOGETHER ON COVER IN 1969, WHICH REMAIN THE ONLY EXAMPLES KNOWN TO PHILATELY. ONE OF THE RAREST STAMPS IN THE WORLD AND A KEY TO A COMPLETE COLLECTION OF UNITED STATES POSTAGE STAMPS.

The distinguishing characteristics of the true B Grill are its size–22 points wide by 18 points high (18 x 15 mm)–and the points-up orientation of the grill, which shows as a pyramidal (male) grill impression on the back. The four recorded 3c B Grill stamps were discovered in 1969 on a cover mailed in February 1869 from Mason, Texas, to Germany. The shade and thinner paper of the 3c B Grill stamps are more typical of the mid-1868 printings and quite different from the paler Rose shades and thick paper of the 1867 and early 1868 3c grilled issues (A, C, D, Z and some E production). The shade and paper indicate that the B Grill was implemented after the 1867 experimental period and after the first two months of regular 1868 grill production. Perhaps the B Grill was created during the process of making a replacement grilling device for one of the two machines. The grilling surface must have worn during production of many thousands of sheets, and it seems likely that replacement grills would become necessary in mid-1868. Through miscalculation or possibly deliberate experimentation, the grill size per stamp on this new B Grill device was twice the width of the F Grill. Based on the small number of surviving copies, this wider grill must have been quickly modified or discarded. Sheets with the B Grill made their way into the regular supply and, in the case of the discovery examples, were used in early 1869.

Lot 828 – 5c Deep Blue, Special Printing (204). Without gum as issued, beautiful rich color and sharp proof-like impression, choice wide margins and nearly perfect centering. Estimative of U$ 350,000.00. Price’s Hammer realized: U$ 375,000.00 + 15% buyer’s premium.

EXTREMELY FINE. WITHOUT QUESTION ONE OF THE THREE OR FOUR FINEST OF THE 18 RECORDED COPIES OF THE 5-CENT 1880 AMERICAN BANK NOTE COMPANY SOFT-PAPER SPECIAL PRINTING.

The 5c 1880 Special Printing on soft paper is one of the most elusive of the Bank Note Special printings. Our census of Scott 204  records only 18 copies of this stamp, including one example in the Miller collection at The New York Public Library. About one-third of the known stamps have minor faults. Of the dozen sound examples available to collectors, this stamp places among the top three or four in terms of centering and margins. It was Alfred H. Casparys choice for his legendary collection, and over the years this stamp has stood the test of time as condition standards have become more rigorous. We anticipate a record realization when this magnificent 5c Taylor Special Printing is offered in the Hansen sale. Census No. 204-UNC-03. Ex Caspary, Ambassador Collection, Cole, Greenblatt, Weisman and Ballman. With 1956, 1988, 2002 and 2008 P.F. certificates, as well as 1991 P.S.E. certificate.

Lot 1062 – 24c Carmine Rose & Blue, 1918 Air Post, Center Inverted (C3a). Position 36, single light hinge mark, the gum and paper are fresh and bright, brilliant colors. Estimative: U$ 500.000,00. Price’s Hammer realized: U$ 337,500.00 + 15% buyer’s premium.

FRESH AND FINE-VERY FINE. A RARE SOUND EXAMPLE OF THE 1918 24-CENT INVERTED JENNY ERROR. WITHOUT QUESTION THIS IS THE MOST FAMOUS STAMP IN AMERICAN PHILATELY.

According to Jenny by George Amick (Amos Press, 1986), the original sheet of 100 Inverted Jenny stamps was purchased for $24 by William T. Robey at the New York Avenue Branch Post Office window in Washington D.C., on May 14, 1918, one day after the stamp was first placed on sale at the main post office. On May 20, Robey sold his sheet for $15,000 to Eugene Klein, a Philadelphia stamp dealer. Klein had already arranged to sell the sheet to Col. Edward H. R. Green for $20,000. Colonel Green instructed Klein to divide the Inverted Jenny sheet into singles and blocks, and to sell all but a few key position blocks. It is well-known among stamp specialists and professionals that examples of the Inverted Jenny come in different grades of freshness and condition. Many of the original 100 stamps were mistreated by collectors during the years, despite the stamps rarity and value. Colonel Green himself allowed moisture to affect some of the stamps he retained. Other examples have become slightly toned from improper storage and climatic conditions. Hinge removal has caused thins and creases in numerous stamps, and a few have been lost to philately — or nearly so, as in the case of the copy swept up in a vacuum cleaner. The stamp offered here, Position 36, is exceptionally fresh and very lightly hinged. It was part of the Sidney A. Hessel collection sold by H. R. Harmer (Part 3, November 305, 1976, lot 1075). Hessel, a long-time collector, might have been the first person to acquire this position when the sheet was broken up by Eugene Klein in 1918 (there is no sale record prior to Hessels ownership). This would explain its exceptionally fresh condition and the presence of a single faint hinge mark. After the Hessel sale, the stamp was owned by Kenneth Wenger, a New Jersey stamp dealer and investor. It eventually became part of the Windsor collection, which was acquired intact by Perry Hansen. Ex. Hessel, Wenger and Windsor. With 1978, 1996 and 2008 P.F. certificates.

2.South America

THE BRAZILIAN PHILATELIC HIGHLIGHTS (June/2008)
The Siegel Auction Galleries, Inc, located in New York, informed that the June 5 and 6 sale of the Islander collections of Brazil, Buenos Aires, Chile, Colombia and Peru were a phenomenal success, with realizations doubling the pre-sale estimate. The Brazil Pack Strip (1843) soared to a record $1,900,000 realization (plus the 15% buyer’s premium), which is by far the highest price ever realized for a South American stamp and one of the highest prices ever realized for any philatelic item. Another Brazilian item, the 90rs Bull’s Eyes unused Panel of 18 stamps, was knocked by the value of $260,000 (plus 15% buyer’s premium). The Buenos Aires (1859) blue “In Peso – Tête-Bêche Pair” realized $575,000 (plus the 15% buyer’s premium), a record for any Argentine stamp, and the Chile (1854) Lithograph “5 centavos” Block of 14 on cover brought $550,000 (plus the 15% buyer’s premium), a record for this country as well. The Peru (1858) Medio Peso Rose Red Error on cover has reached the impressive amount of $250,000 (plus 15% buyers premium). See the images below.

 

 

Chile

 

 

 Brasil

 Peru

Buenos Aires

BOLIVIA – PATIÑO COLLECTION (March/2008)
This extraordinary collection belonging to Jamie Ortiz-Patiño was sold by Spink – Shreves at New York on March 5, 2008. This collection was formed between the years of 1970 and 1990. It is said that this collection is, without reservation, the better, finest and most important collection of Bolivia ever formed to be sold in a public auction. Speaking of the “Condors” one very knowledgeable Bolivian specialist stated upon viewing the collection that he had never seen so many Condor covers in one place in all his life. The prices realized are very impressive. It is my pleasure to show some of the highlights items.

Lot 2133 – 1867 5c violet single
and 10c brown vertical pair. Mixed
issued value combination of double
rate foreign mail to Peru. Date lined
at La Paz on January 16, 1868.
The
only recorded Condor cover with
two different stamp values
. Est.
U$S 40.000 to 50.000. Harmer
price: U$S 260.000.

Lot 2114 – 1867 5c green vertical pair
tied by a Lamar/Franca postmark plus
a Great Britain 1/- Green, plate 4 tied
by a “C39” postmark from the British
Postal Agency at Cobija. An amazing
combination mixed franking on an
entire foreign mail cover to Baltimore.
There are only two covers known with
Condor and Great Britain stamp mixed
franking.
The only mixed franking of
Bolivian and Great Britain stamps that
actually was serviced by both Post
Offices
. Ex. Dale-Lichtenstein, N.
Hubbard. Est. U$S 50000-75.000.
Harmer Price: U$S 160.000.

Lot 2138 – 1867 10c brown vertical
strip of three, cover from La Paz to
Tacna, Peru, being the triple rate
abroad. The only example of this
franking known
. Ex. Caspary, N.
Hubbard. Est. U$S 20.000 to 25.000.
Harmer Price: U$S 75.000.

Lot 2087 – 1867 10c brown, the
unique complete unused sheet of
78 stamps.
This is the only
recorded sheet yet remaining
intact
. Ex Ferrary. Est. U$S
40.000-50.000. Harmer Price:
U$S 120.000.

the end

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