The Special Phillatelic book:” five centuries of the tile in portugal

Dr IWANCYBERMUSEUM SPECIAL SHOW

THE PORTUGEUS LIMITED SPECIAL PHILLATELIC BOOK

Azulejo

5 centuries of the tile in Portugal 1989

 

Limited edition joint between Portugeus postal telecommunication and museum national Azulejo Portugal

Edited  by Rafael Salinas Calado

 

  

Limited Stamp Sheet edition1.000.000

Dr iwan collection no.0002847 

And

  

Book 10.000

Dr Iwan collection no 02847

 

 

 

MUSEUM DUNIA MAYA DR IWAN S.

Dr IWAN ‘S CYBERMUSEUM

 THE FIRST INDONESIAN CYBERMUSEUM

  MUSEUM DUNIA MAYA PERTAMA DI INDONESIA

   DALAM PROSES UNTUK MENDAPATKAN SERTIFIKAT MURI

     PENDIRI DAN PENEMU IDE

      THE FOUNDER

    Dr IWAN SUWANDY, MHA

                     

The Driwan’s  Cybermuseum

                    

(Museum Duniamaya Dr Iwan)

Showroom :

The show to celebrating the 100.000 visit of Driwancybermuseum,wordpress,com

Jakarta@copyright dr iwanSuwandy 2011

Look the picture of site stat of the web blog by wordpress.com

 

Dr Iwan Notes:”Thank you very much to all visitor support,correction and suggestions,we hope after this the cybermuseum will be growth-up and became more populer as the best Cybermuseum of the world, please support and pray for Driwancybermuseum”

!!!!!!!!VIVA DRIWANCYBERMUSEUM!!!!!!!

 

FRONT COVER

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

FRONTPAGE

 

LIMITED STAMP SHEET COLLECTIONS

 

 

 

PREFACE

 

INTRODUCTION

 

TILES IN 15TH-16TH CENTURIES

 

 

 

 

THE XVII th CENTURIES TILES

STAMP

 

 

 

 

TILES

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

XVIIIth CENTURIES TILES

STAMPS

 

 

 

TILES

 

 

 

 

XIX th CENTURIES TILES

STAMPS

 

 

 

TILES

 

XXth CENTURIES TILES

STAMP

 

 

TILES

 

 

 

MORE INFO ABOUT PORTUGAL TILES STAMPS

Postugal

 

 

FIVE CENTUREI OF TILES IN POTUGAL 1

This is the first of five issues tracing the history of ceramic tiles in Portugal, where they have been widely used since the late 15th century for the decoration of interior and exterior walls and floors of public buildings and private homes. Until the mid-16th century, tiles were mainly imported from Spain, but as foreign artisans settled, local production started to soar. All tiles in this issue are from the collection of the National Tile Museum , in Lisbon, and showcase different manufacturing techniques and design patterns. Early techniques and designs were taken from the Moors, who introduced tiles in the Iberian Peninsula.

 

Rajola tile from Setúbal (Valencia, 15th cent.) 

Tracery pattern tile from Coimbra’s Old Cathedral (Seville, ca. 1503) 

Arms of Jaime, Duke of Bragança, from the Vila Viçosa palace (Seville, 1510) 

Pisana tile from Funchal’s Santa Clara convent (Lisbon, ca. 1595)

The stamps were designed by the Post Office Philatelic Services, issued on 16 March, 13 June, 28 August and 16 December 1981, and circulated until 31 August 1989. The Mint, in Lisbon, lithographed 5 million copies of each stamp on enamelled paper sheets of 5×10 stamps, with a phosphor band and perforation 12×11¾. Moreover, the Mint printed 250 thousand miniature sheets with the four stamps and, for each stamp, 250 thousand miniature sheets with 6 copies of the stamp.

 

Five Centuries of Tiles in Portugal 2

This is the second set of stamps tracing the history of ceramic tiles in Portugal. The tiles on the first stamp belong to the collection of the National Tile Museum, in Lisbon, which is located in the former Convent of Madre de Deus. The 4×4 tile pattern on the last stamp comes from the cloister of that convent. The quadrilobate pattern can be seen in many churches in Portugal. Dutch-inspired blue and white tiles started to become popular by the end of the 17th century.

 

Italo-Flemish pattern (17th cent.) 

Altar panel showing oriental tapestry (17th cen  

Quadrilobate pattern (1630-1640)

Quadrilobate pattern (1670-1690)

The stamps were designed by the Post Office Philatelic Services, issued on 24 March, 11 June, 22 September and 15 December 1982, and circulated until 31 August 1989. The Mint, in Lisbon, lithographed 1 million copies of the last stamp and 3 million copies of each other one, on enamelled paper sheets of 5×10 stamps, with a phosphor band and perforation 12×11¾. Moreover, the Mint printed 250 thousand miniature sheets with the four stamps and, for each stamp, 250 thousand miniature sheets with 6 copies of the stamp.

 

 

Five Centuries of Tiles in Portugal 3

 

This is the third set of stamps tracing the history of ceramic tiles in Portugal. The piece on the first stamp is part of a set of six panels existing at the Palace of the Counts of Calheta, which nowadays hosts the Tropical Museum in Lisbon. The third and fourth pieces belong to National Tile Museum, in Lisbon, and were made in the studio of Gabriel del Barco y Minusca. The third piece shows an albarrada, a floral vase flanked by animals. Albarradas were probably inspired by Flemish paintings of flower vases.

 

Figurative panel: hunt scene (17th/18th cent.) 

Single figure tiles (18th cent.) 

Albarrada (18th cent.) 

Figurative panel: turkish horseman (18th cent.)

The stamps were designed by the Post Office Philatelic Services, issued on 16 March, 16 June, 18 October and 23 November 1983, and circulated until 31 August 1989. The Mint, in Lisbon, lithographed 1 million copies of each stamp on enamelled paper sheets of 5×10 stamps, with a phosphor band and perforation 12×11¾. Moreover, the Mint printed 150 thousand miniature sheets with the four stamps and, for each stamp, 200 thousand miniature sheets with 6 copies of the stamp.

 

Five Centuries of Tiles in Portugal 4

 

This is the fourth set of stamps tracing the history of ceramic tiles in Portugal. The panel on the first stamp was manufactured by Real Fábrica do Rato, in Lisbon, and can be found in a vestry of the former Madre de Deus convent, which now hosts the National Tile Museum. The tile panel on the second stamp is part of the wall decorations of the Alvor-Pombal palace, also in Lisbon, which now hosts the National Museum of Ancient Art. Portugal adopted the Brazilian fashion of using tiles for decorating the façade of buildings when Brazilian immigrants in Porto started to produce, in the second half of the 19th century, monochromatic high-relief tiles for that purpose, like those on the third stamp. The Art Nouveau pieces on the last stamp were designed by Rafael Bordalo Pinheiro for the decoration of bakeries, and were manufactured by the factory he founded in Caldas da Rainha.

 

King José I coat of arms (18th cent.) 

Ashlar in D. Maria style (18th cent.)

Pattern for façades (19th cent.)

Grasshoppers and wheat (19th cent.)

The stamps were designed by the Post Office Philatelic Services, issued on 8 March, 18 July, 3 August and 17 October 1984, and circulated until 31 August 1989. The Mint, in Lisbon, lithographed 1 million copies of each stamp on enamelled paper sheets of 5×10 stamps, with a phosphor band and perforation 12×11¾. Moreover, the Mint printed 150 thousand miniature sheets with the four stamps and, for each stamp, 200 thousand miniature sheets with 6 copies of the stamp.

 

Five Centuries of Tiles in Portugal 5

This last set of stamps illustrates the 20th century history of ceramic tiles in Portugal. The tiles on the first stamp are part of a larger panel in the Faculty of Letters of the University of Lisbon. The tiles on the second stamp are part of a street panel on Infante Santo Avenue, in Lisbon. The two other stamps depict tiles in the collection of the National Tile Museum, also in Lisbon. Manuel Cargaleiro’s tiles on the last stamp are an update of the 18th century single figure style shown in the third issue. Maria Keil was one of the major forces of the revival and renovation of the art of tiles in the second half of the 20th century, having designed from 1957 to 1982 the abstract tile panels decorating 19 Lisbon subway stations. You can see her and Cargaleiro’s work, amongst others, by selecting the individual stations on the Lisbon Subway Art site.

 

Tiles by Jorge Barradas (1957) 

Tiles by Maria Keil (20th cent.)

Woman’s head by Querubim Lapa (20th cent.) 

Tiles by Manuel Cargaleiro (20th cent.)

The stamps were designed by the Post Office Philatelic Services, issued on 13 February, 19 June, 20 August and 15 November 1985, and circulated until 31 December 1992. The Mint, in Lisbon, lithographed 1 million copies of each stamp on enamelled paper sheets of 5×10 stamps, with a phosphor band and perforation 12×11¾. Moreover, the Mint printed 150 thousand miniature sheets with the four stamps and, for each stamp, 120 thousand miniature sheets with 6 copies of the stamp.

PS THE COMPLETE COLLECTIONS EXIST,BUT ONLY FOR PREMIUM MEMBER ,PLEASE SUBSCRIBED VIA COMMENT.

The end@copyright Dr iwan suwandy 2011

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