The Indonesian Animal Natural History Collections

WELCOME COLLECTORS FROM ALL OVER THE WORLD

                          SELAMAT DATANG KOLEKTOR INDONESIA DAN ASIAN

                                                AT DR IWAN CYBERMUSEUM

                                          DI MUSEUM DUNIA MAYA DR IWAN S.

_____________________________________________________________________

SPACE UNTUK IKLAN SPONSOR

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 *ill 001

                      *ill 001  LOGO MUSEUM DUNIA MAYA DR IWAN S.*ill 001

                                THE FIRST INDONESIAN CYBERMUSEUM

                           MUSEUM DUNIA MAYA PERTAMA DI INDONESIA

                 DALAM PROSES UNTUK MENDAPATKAN SERTIFIKAT MURI

                                        PENDIRI DAN PENEMU IDE

                                                     THE FOUNDER

                                            Dr IWAN SUWANDY, MHA

                                                         

    BUNGA IDOLA PENEMU : BUNGA KERAJAAN MING SERUNAI( CHRYSANTHENUM)

  

                         WELCOME TO THE MAIN HALL OF FREEDOM               

                     SELAMAT DATANG DI GEDUNG UTAMA “MERDEKA

                     Please Enter

                    

              DNHC SHOWROOM

(Driwan Natural History  Cybermuseum)

SHOWCASE :

The Natural History cybermuseum 

(Museum dunia Maya Sejarah  Alam semesta  )

 Frame One :

The Indonesian animal natural History Collections

1.Botany (Fauna)

1)Rafflesia Arnoldi Flower

2)

 Black Orchid

3)Kantong Semar Orchid

2.ZOOLOGY

1.)ORANG UTAN

2)PAGAI MONKEY

3)RHINOCHORUS ONE HORN (BADAK CULA SATU)

4)MURAI BATU BIRD

5)LONG TAIL COCK

6)PERKUTUT BIRD

7)NAPOLEON FISH

8)ANCIENT FISH

9)AROWANA FISH

Arowana

Arowana
Silver arowana, Osteoglossum bicirrhosum
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Actinopterygii
Order: Osteoglossiformes
Family: Osteoglossidae
Genera
Subfamily Heterotidinae
 Arapaima
 Heterotis
Subfamily Osteoglossinae
 Osteoglossum
 †Phareodus
 Scleropages

Arowanas are freshwater bony fish of the family Osteoglossidae, also known as bonytongues.[1] In this family of fishes, the head is bony and the elongate body is covered by large, heavy scales, with a mosaic pattern of canals. The dorsal and the anal fins have soft rays and are long based, while the pectoral and ventral fins are small. The name “bonytongues” is derived from a toothed bone on the floor of the mouth, the “tongue”, equipped with teeth that bite against teeth on the roof of the mouth. The fish can obtain oxygen from air by sucking it into the swim bladder, which is lined with capillaries like lung tissue. The arowana is an “obligatory air breather”

.[2]

Contents

 

Classification and distribution

Osteoglossids are basal (primitive) fish from the lower Tertiary and are placed in the actinopterygiid order Osteoglossiformes. There are ten described living species: three from South America, one from Africa, four from Asia, and the remaining two from Australia.

[1]

Osteoglossidae is the only exclusively freshwater fish family found on both sides of the Wallace Line.[3] This may be explained by the fact that Asian arowanas (S. formosus) diverged from the Australian Scleropages, S. jardinii and S. leichardti, about 140 million years ago, making it likely that Asian arowanas were carried to Asia on the Indian subcontinent.

[4][5]

 Behavior

Osteoglossids are carnivorous, often being specialized surface feeders. They are excellent jumpers; it has been reported that Osteoglossum species have been seen leaping more than 6 feet (almost 2 metres) from the water surface to pick off insects and birds from overhanging branches in South America, hence the nickname “water monkeys”. Arowanas have been rumored to capture prey as large as low flying bats. All species are large, and the arapaima is one of the world’s largest freshwater fish, at 2.5 metres (8.2 ft) in length.[6] Arowana species typically grow to around 3 to 4 feet in captivity.

Several species of osteoglossid exhibit extensive parental care. They build nests and protect the young after they hatch. Some species are mouthbrooders, the parents holding sometimes hundreds of eggs in their mouths. The young may make several tentative trips outside the parent’s mouth to investigate the surroundings before leaving permanently.These fishes are best kept with live feed and they easily outgrow the tank within a span of 8/10 months. Always preferred in a large type aquarium.[6]

In the aquarium

Arowanas tend to merge in groups of five to eight; any fewer may show an excess of dominance and aggression. Some compatible fish often partnered with this fish are clown knifefish, pacu, oscars, plecostomus, jaguar cichlids, green terrors, gar and any other semi-aggressive fish that cannot fit in the arowana’s mouth.

Australian species are best kept singular in aquaria.[7][8]

Species

The family contains two subfamilies, Heterotidinae and Osteoglossinae, with all but two of the ten extant species being members of the latter. Species are given with one or more prominent common names.

Family Osteoglossidae

  • Subfamily Heterotidinae
  • Subfamily Osteoglossinae
    • Genus Osteoglossum (Cuvier, 1829)
    • Genus Scleropages
      • Red-tailed golden arowana Scleropages aureus (Pouyad, Sudarto & Teugels, 2003)
      • Green arowana or gold crossback arowana, Scleropages formosus (Schlegel & Müller, 1844)
      • Gulf saratoga, red saratoga or northern spotted barramundi, Scleropages jardinii (Saville-Kent, 1892)
      • Red arowana, super red arowana, or chili red arowana, Scleropages legendrei (Pouyad, Sudarto & Teugels, 2003)
      • Saratoga, silver saratoga or spotted barramundi, Scleropages leichardti Günther, 1864
      • Silver Asian arowana, Scleropages macrocephalus (Pouyad, Sudarto & Teugels, 2003)

This species is one of two sometimes called the Australian arowana or Australian bonytongue.

A genetic study shows that the lineage leading to the arapaima and African arowana diverged about 220 million years ago, during the Late Triassic; the lineage leading to the silver and blackish blue arowanas of South America diverged about 170 million years ago, during the Middle Jurassic. The lineage leading to the Australian arowanas diverged from that leading to the Asian arowanas about 140 million years ago, during the Early Cretaceous.[5]

 Fossil record

At least five extinct genera, known only from fossils, are classified as Osteoglossids; these date back at least as far as the Late Cretaceous. Other fossils from as far back as the Late Jurassic or Early Cretaceous are widely considered to belong to the arowana superorder Osteoglossomorpha. Osteoglossomorph fossils have been found on all continents except Antarctica.[9] These fossil genera include Brychaetus, Joffrichthys, and Phareodus.

the end @ copyright Dr Iwan Suwandy 2011

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