The Gibraltar Collections Exhibition at Dr Iwan cybermuseum

Driwancybermuseum’s Blog

tarian betawi tempo dulu                 

                           WELCOME COLLECTORS FROM ALL OVER THE WORLD

                          SELAMAT DATANG KOLEKTOR INDONESIA DAN ASIAN

                                                AT DR IWAN CYBERMUSEUM

                                          DI MUSEUM DUNIA MAYA DR IWAN S.

_____________________________________________________________________

SPACE UNTUK IKLAN SPONSOR

_____________________________________________________________________

 *ill 001

                      *ill 001  LOGO MUSEUM DUNIA MAYA DR IWAN S.*ill 001

                                THE FIRST INDONESIAN CYBERMUSEUM

                           MUSEUM DUNIA MAYA PERTAMA DI INDONESIA

                 DALAM PROSES UNTUK MENDAPATKAN SERTIFIKAT MURI

                                        PENDIRI DAN PENEMU IDE

                                                     THE FOUNDER

                                            Dr IWAN SUWANDY, MHA

                                                         

    BUNGA IDOLA PENEMU : BUNGA KERAJAAN MING SERUNAI( CHRYSANTHENUM)

  

                         WELCOME TO THE MAIN HALL OF FREEDOM               

                     SELAMAT DATANG DI GEDUNG UTAMA “MERDEKA” 

Showcase :

 The Gibraltar Historic Collections Exhibition

Queen Victoria Stamps 1886-1901

Gibraltar issued its first ever stamp in 1886 when the Colonial Government of Gibraltar assumed control of its Postal Services. As an interim measure, Bermuda stamp plates were overprinted with ‘Gibraltar’ using different colours. These were replaced by Gibraltar’s own design in December of that same year.

Gibraltar’s stamps were used with peseta values from 1889 to 1898 since trade was carried out in this currency.

Before 1886, British and Spanish stamps were used according to the type of mail and other arrangements. British stamps used in Gibraltar may be identified by the use of cancels containing the numeral A26 or the letter G in oval bars

Gibraltar viewed from the south in 1852

The history of Gibraltar spans over 100,000 years, making the Rock of Gibraltar and the surrounding area one of the longest inhabited places in Europe. It was inhabited during prehistoric times by Neanderthals and may represent one of their last settlements before their extinction some 24,000 years ago. Its recorded history began with the Phoenicians around 950 BC. The Carthaginians and Romans also visited and are said to have built shrines there, though they did not settle.

After a brief period of Visigothic rule following the collapse of the Roman Empire, Gibraltar was conquered by the Moors in 711 AD. The Kingdom of Castile annexed it in 1309, lost it in 1333 and finally regained it in 1462, subsequently incorporating it into the unified Kingdom of Spain. It remained under Spanish rule until 1704, when it was captured by an AngloDutch fleet in the name of the Habsburg ruler Charles VI. Following Charles’ death, Gibraltar was ceded by Spain to the British, becoming one of Britain’s key colonies in the Mediterranean Sea.

Spain subsequently sought to restore its sovereignty over Gibraltar through military, diplomatic and economic pressure. During the wars of the 18th century between Britain and Spain, Gibraltar was besieged and bombarded for extended periods but the attacks were successfully repulsed. The colony grew rapidly during the 19th century as Gibraltar became a key British naval base and stopping point for vessels en route to India via the Suez Canal.

During the 20th century, Gibraltar played a vital role in the Second World War by enabling the British to control the entrance to the Mediterranean. The Spanish dictator General Francisco Franco revived Spain’s claim to the territory after the war, imposing restrictions on travel and severing communications links with Gibraltar. The Spanish claim was pursued through the United Nations under the aegis of decolonization. Spain’s position was supported by Latin American countries but was rejected by Britain and the Gibraltarians themselves, who vigorously asserted their right to self-determination. Negotiations over Gibraltar’s status have continued between Britain and Spain but have not reached any conclusion

PS. THE COMPLETE EXHIBTION LOOK AT Dr IWAN CYBERMUSEUM,please click hhtp://www.Driwnacyabermsueum.wordpress.com

the end@copyright Dr Iwan suwandy 2010

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