Welcome to The Rare China Ceramic Exhibition at Dr Iwan Cybermuseum

WELCOME TO THE RARE CHINA CERAMIC EXHIBITIONS

COMPLETE  EXHIBITION  click. hhtp://www,Driwancybermuseum.wordpress.com.

THE SAMPLE OF EXHIBITION

SHOWCASE ONE :THE RARE TANG DINASTY CERAMIC

SHOWCASE TWO : THE RARE SUNG DINASTY CERAMIC

SHOWCASE THREE:  THE RARE YUAN DINASTY CERAMIC

FRAME ONE : THE RARE YUAN BLUE AND WHITE CERAMIC

Kublai Khan

Khubilai
Khagan of the Mongol Empire
Founder of the Yuan Dynasty
Emperor of China
YuanEmperorAlbumKhubilaiPortrait.jpg
Portrait of Kublai Khan during the era of the Great Yuan.
Reign May 5, 1260 – February 18, 1294
Coronation May 5, 1260
Titles Zhongtong (中統) 1260–1264
Zhiyuan (至元) 1264–1294
Setsen Khan (Цэцэн хаан)
Temple name: Shizu (世祖)
Posthumous name: Emperor Shengde
Shengong Wenwu
(聖德神功文武皇帝)
Born 23 September 1215
Died 18 February 1294(aged 78–79)
Place of death Dadu (Khanbalic)
Buried Burkhan Khaldun, Khentii province
Predecessor Mongke Khan
Jingim
Successor Temur Khan
Consort Chabi
Consort Tegulen
Wife Nambui
Royal House Borjigin
Mongolian: Боржигин
Royal anthem There is only god in heaven and only one lord Chingis khaan on earth.
Father Tolui
Mother Sorghaghtani Beki

Kublai (or Khubilai) Khan (Mongolian: Хубилай хаан; Chinese: 忽必烈; pinyin: Hūbìliè) (September 23, 1215[1] – February 18, 1294[2]) was the fifth Great Khan of the Mongol Empire from 1260 to 1294 and the founder of the Yuan Dynasty in East Asia. As the second son of Tolui and Sorghaghtani Beki and a grandson of Genghis Khan, he claimed the title of Khagan of the Ikh Mongol Uls (Mongol Empire) in 1260 after the death of his older brother Möngke in the previous year, though his younger brother Ariq Böke was also given this title in the Mongolian capital at Karakorum. He eventually won the battle against Ariq Böke in 1264, and the succession war essentially marked the beginning of disunity in the empire.[3] Kublai’s real power was limited to China and Mongolia after the victory over Ariq Böke, though his influence still remained in the Ilkhanate, and to a lesser degree, in the Golden Horde, in the western parts of the Mongol Empire.[4][5][6] His realm reached from the Pacific to the Urals, from Siberia to Afghanistan – one fifth of the world’s inhabited land area.[7]

In 1271, Kublai established the Yuan Dynasty, which at that time ruled over present-day Mongolia, Tibet, Eastern Turkestan, North China, much of Western China, and some adjacent areas, and assumed the role of Emperor of China. By 1279, the Yuan forces had successfully annihilated the last resistance of the Southern Song Dynasty, and Kublai thus became the first non-Chinese Emperor who conquered all China. He was the only Mongol khan after 1260 to win new great conquests. the end@copyright Xr Iwan Suwandy 2010

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