PUI-THE MARK OF CHINA CERAMIC

PUI-Premium Uniquecollection Info,iwansuwandy.wordpress.com

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                                    THE MARK OF CHINA CERAMIC

Cretated by Dr IWAN S from his vintage books ,original  and fake ceramic collections

                                         *001

                              Private limited  e-b00k special for collectors

                                     Jakarta @copyright Dr IWAN S 2010

*this Dinasti Qing Khang Hsi era repro Wanli Imperial Ceramic found at west Java

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PREFACE

I have learned very long time almost starting from 1976, autodicdac, unitl now the mark of  rare chinese ceramic,due to many repro and comperative study the difference between the yuan,ming and qing dinasty ceramic Imperial or common, and the repro one. Many my friends never studied dan only look at the ordinary books info, they alway made mistade during identified the ceramic collection.

The repro china imperial ceramic were starting during the late Ming between  the Wan Li dinasti and the Khansi Qing dinasty ,especially during Cheng Long, yung cheng and the latest Qing dinasti Tong Xu many foreigner asking the kiln to produced the copy of the very rare ming imperial ceramic of Zhuan Te, Ceng Huan and Ceng Te dinasti. Many of this repro belong to the chine imperial ceramic musuem at Teipeh The republic of China which bring by the China Nationalist to Teipeh when the Mao Regime win the war.

Circa 1900-1940, many Japanese trader in Indonesia bring the that chinese imperial repro, and many sold at the Gang Torong Indonesia ,that call gang Torong ceramic, and now they know that ceramic were the China Nationalist ceramic, thay call Chung Hua Min Kuo ceramic.

Circa 1970-1976, many Chinese imperial repro ceramic were spold at Belawan seaport Medan, and also circa 1980-1985 during first Batam Riau Island (not Bantam or Banten)  free seaport open also many chinese imperial ceramic repro were sold their, I still remember because I have alo bought some repro there, then in 1985-1990, Indonesian ceramic trader were nade a perfect ming imperial ceramic repro with the color and weigt,but the mark were difficult to repro, I have this repro the bigger yuan plate, Wan Li plate, and the anamese bigger plate also repro.

The yunior ceramic collectors have been fooled by the ceramic trader,and they still thingking their collections were the guinine ceramic, If he look at the profesion chinese ceramic litertaure, he will know that the original perfect condition imperial ceramic very difficult to find and the pricre per item now more than one million US$ that is why if you buy only one million Rupiah or US$100,- that is the repro or fake cermic.

To have the original markand design of the original chinese imperial ceramic, I alway bought the search and broken condition of the originaL CERAMIC AND COMPARE WITH THE FAKE ONE , I hawe artie about that with some sample of the original mark. Now I wriet special e-book for the senior ceramic collectors, and I hove many info and comment from the expert to made this e-book more complete.

I want to thank you to my ceramic collectors from Pawan river Ketapang and Sambas city west Borneo  who have help me with many original imperial ceramic info and search to put in this book added my own collections faound from Aceh lhok seumawe, kota cina Medan,Pekan Heran Rengat Indragiri Riau, Jambi, Palembang, west sumatra, Banten, Solo, Malang , Makssar and Ambon. Without their information this e-book never finish.

Jakarta July 2010

Dr IWAN S

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CHAPTER ONE : THE SECRET HOW TO READ THE CHINESE CERAMIC’S  MARK

1.CHINESE IMPERIAL CERAMIC MARK

Reign Marks on Qing Ceramics 1644-1912

Chinese Porcelain Reign Marks of the Qing Dynasty

The practice of painting marks on porcelain on a regular basis was established during the Xuande reign near the beginning of the Ming period, in the early 15th century. The mark usually consisted of the reign title of the emperor and the name of the dynasty. The Qing dynasty adopted this practice which continued for 500 years, enjoying a brief revival in 1915.

The style of writing of Qing reign marks varies, but can be separated into two broad divisions within which there are further sub-divisions.

In the first division written in ‘kai-shu’ (regular or modern script), the mark consists of six characters written in two columns of three characters. It is read from right to left and in descending order. The first character reads ‘da’ (great), followed by ‘qing’ (pure), the official name of the alien Manchu dynasty. This is followed by the two characters giving the reign title of the ruling emperor. The fifth character reads ‘nian’ (year) and the final character reads ‘zhi’ (made/manufactured).

The mark below should be read as follows:

This translates as “made in the reign of Kangxi (reign title of the second Qing emperor) in the Great Qing dynasty”.

The second broad division of reign marks is written in ‘Zhuan’ (archaic seal script). It reflects the eighteenth century’s obsession with the archaic style. The seal script reign marks are translated in exactly the same way as in the ‘kai-shu’ script.

The Kangxi reign mark in seal script reads;

As Qing dynasty emperor succeeded emperor styles of marks varied and some of these variants deserve attention.

The reign marks of Shunzhi (1644-1662), the first Qing emperor, are known to be on a rare group of violet-blue glazed dishes. However, the practice of writing the mark on the base of an artefact only became common in the Kangxi period (1662-1722). In the early part of this reign conditions were unsettled in China. and the use of reign marks on porcelain was prohibited. The prohibition must either have been rescinded or ignored because large quantities of non-imperial commercial wares with the Kangxi mark have survived.

The majority of Kangxi marks can be divided into three chronological groups on the basis of their calligraphy, provided allowances are made for the style, shape and size of the object to which the marks are applied. Large, bold, freely written marks are rather loose and untidy. The calligraphy of the third group tends to be precise, tighter, rather small and less ‘free’ than the other two groups. The third style is especially common on a small group of imperial wares usually small in size and of superb quality; for example the ‘peach bloom’ pieces, with their rich but subtle copper-derived glaze and the ‘month cups’. These small fine pieces were probably produced later in the reign.

Another well-known group of the late Kangxi imperial pieces exhibit a character variant. These pieces decorated in famille-rose enamels have the ‘kai-shu’ character ‘nian’ replaced by ‘yu’ (imperial). They are believed to have been decorated at the Peking Palace workshops rather than at Jingdezhen, where most of the Qing imperial wares were produced and decorated.

One suspect belief is that when a piece has a Kangxi mark written in three columns of two characters rather than two columns of six, it may be Yongzhen.

‘Zhuan’ archaic seal script marks do appear on some pieces of Kangxi porcelain but onloy become common in the succeeding reign of Yongzhen (1723-1735). As previously stated, they are a reflection of the self-conscious archaism of the age. They are also frequently associated with specific shapes and glazes.

Vases from the Yongzheng and Qianlong periods, which are inspired by archaic forms and have cervine or elephant-head handles, often have ‘Zhuan’ seal marks. The marks appear on the base in underglaze blue or are incised or moulded. The glaze sometimes associated wiothy the use of seal marks is the one that simulates bronze or iron – the archaic influence again.

The archaic seal mark really came to prominence on an even greater range of ceramic wares in the Qianlong period (1736-1795), largely ousting the regular script. Ceramic production at the Imperial kiln was enormous in the eighteenth century, it has been suggested that the painting of reign marks was entrusted to a very few calligraphers. The study of marks found on Yongzheng and Qianlong porcelain reveals ceratin distinctly recognisable hands.

Qianlong seal marks are often written in iron-red or gilt as well as underglaze blue. They can also be incised, stamped or moulded in relief. On a small group of porcelain, the so-called ‘Gu yue’ wares, puce and overglaze blue enamel marks appear. Seal marks can be found in a cartouche on the neck of a vase, where the seal has been broken up and is presented in a horizontal format from right to left.

The details of the calligraphy depend on the method used to apply the mark. These details also altered from one reign to the next, and sometimes these anachronistic quirks indicate if the mark is contemporary with the period rather than being nineteenth century or later. For example, during the Qianlong period, the six character ‘zhi’ (manufactured) when written in underglaze blue should have a small trident with five prongs. In the copies we usually find only three prongs. In the execution of the water radical of the Qing character there are similar anomalies in style that betray a later date. In genuine pieces the size of the seal should be in proportion to the base upon which it is written and the rows of the characters tend to be regular. The marks of the Yongzheng period often have a greater elegance than those of the Qianlong period, which can appear stilted. One common feature of the nineteenth century copies of the earlier Qing reigns, is that the characters are composed of ‘hollow lines’ filled with watery interiors, which are easily seen with a magnifying glass. These ‘hollow lines’ result from inferior mixing of the cobalt blue. It is also believed that the cobalt available in the nineteenth century was not of such good quality.

Comparing the underglaze-blue seal marks of the various Qing emperors, one can recognise distinct changes. These are especially noticeable in the ‘qing’ character and again, more prominently, in the water radical of this character. Typical forms of writing the water radical are shown below:

N.B. There are no recorded archaic seal marks on Kangxi porcelain.

Before 1800 and for a large part of the nineteenth century the Imperial factory employed specialist calligraphers, and as a result marks on imperial porcelain are extremely well written. In contrast the quality of the marks produced by the commercial factories, for private consumption, varied greatly. In some instances marks were not readily decipherable. Certain pieces bearing marks in aubergine enamel are thought to be items destined for burial rites and internment with the dead. This type of mark is often seen on a range of small yellow ground dishes decorated on the ‘biscuit’ with aubergine and green dragons.

In the reign of Jiaqing (1796-1820) and Daoguang (1820-1850) the bulk of the imperial wares are marked with the archaic seal, a continuation of its popularity from the Qianlong period. On the Xianfeng (1851-1861) imperial wares it is equally common to find the regular ‘kai-shu’ marks. In the last three reigns of the Qing period we find the seal script has all but vanished although there are a few Guangxu (1875-1908) pieces which are known to be modelled on a well-known type of the Jiaqing period which is inscribed with a poem on the preparation and drinking of good tea.

From the reign of Xianfeng (1851-1861) onwards a great many non-imperial wares bear perfunctory stamped marks in iron-red. These are of little calligraphic interest and the wares on which we find these marks are almost always of negligible quality.

Qing period marks are fascinating. Their more important characteristics are outlined above.This broad, and by no means exhaustive categorizat ion of the marks should form a good basis for further study.

Chinese Porcelain MING Reign Marks

Chinese Porcelain Ming Reign Marks

2.. HOW TO READ THE CHINESE IMPERIAL CERAMIC MARK

The chinece native charcter read like arabic language from left top to below and then to the right the same.

2. What the meaning of the chinese charcter

A. six character mark

                                 

1) Ta means Great in japanese  Dai

2) Ming means sunlight, in japanese Nihon

3) name of the dinasty in two character

4)  Nien Hao meand Produced by

B. Four Character Mark

                    

1) and 2) name of dinasty

1) Cheng

2) Hua

3) and 4) nien hao mean produced by

3) Nien mean produced

4) Hao mean by

C.SIX CHARACTER QING DINASTY

1) HAN CHARACTER

*char at arrow means Qing

2) MANCHUCHARACTER

(1)NEW  REPRO

(2) ORIGINAL

CHAPTER TWO : THE MARK OF CHINESE IMPERIAL CERAMIC

Chinese Porcelain Ming Reign Marks

1. THE MARK OF EARLY MING IMPERIAL CERAMIC

1) HUNG WU

2) YUNG LO

2.THE MARK OF MIDDLE MING IMPERIAL CERAMIC

1) Ming Tsuan Te

2) Original Ming Ceng Hua

3) original Ming Cheng Te

3.THE MARK OF  LATE MING IMPERIAL CERAMIC

1) Original Ming Wanli

(1)original animal mark wanli

(2)original hall mark wanli

(3)original four character

a) square mark

b) loose mark

(4)original six character

2) Ming Wanli repro Qing Khang Hsi

The Qing Khang Hsi writting character were sharpest that the Ming Wan Li style  compare with original Wan Li above.

4. THEMARK OF EARLY QING IMPERIAL CERAMIC

1) original Khang Hsi

(1) original six character

(2) Original  Kang Hsi  Qing Tze Chen square mark

(a) Round mark

(b) animal mark

2) originak Cheng Lung

3) original Yung Cheng

4) original Tuo Kuang

5. THE MARK OF  LATE QING IMPERIAL CERAMIC

1) original tong Hsu

2) original hall mark

3) fake repro mark

6.THE ORIGINAL CHINESE CERAMIC MINT MATK

1) MING IMPERIAL MINT MARK AND THE DESIGN

2) QING IMPERIAL MINT MARK AND THE DESIGN

CHAPTER THREE: THE MARK OF CHINA NATIONALIST CERAMIC

CHAPTER ONE Bleu de Hue (Fr.)
19th century Chinese export porcelain for the Vietnamese market. See Glossary: Bleu de Hue for more information.
   1. Mark reads Nei Fu, can be translated as “Inner Court”. On Chinese “Bleu de Hue” porcelain, for the Vietnamese market. Mid 19th C.

CHAPTER FOUR: THE MARK OF PEOPLE REPUBLIC OF CHINA CERAMIC

CHAPTER TWO Brown etched marks
   1. Chenghua Nian Zhi (Chenghua Period Make). Late 20th century, post “Cultural Revolution”.

CHAPTER FIVE : THE MARK OF CHINESE MODERN  CERAMIC

THE END @ copyright Dr IWAN S 2010.

5 thoughts on “PUI-THE MARK OF CHINA CERAMIC

  1. Manuel Jimenez March 17, 2011 / 11:26 pm

    Can you please contact me on a matter related to this article? I need some info on ceramic that matches Chapter 1: Reign Marks on Qing Ceramics 1644-1912.

    Thanks

    • iwansuwandy March 19, 2011 / 3:26 am

      hallo Manuel,
      I hva contact you via your e mail, after this communication via my e mal if you want more info must be the premium member of the blog.
      sincerely yours
      Dr Iwan Suwandy

  2. Feiicia November 30, 2012 / 11:06 am

    Hi, Read about your findings about the Qing Dynasty. I have a Xianfeng reign during the qing dynasty’s vase. Not sure if it is a genuine vase and worth anything? Could you reply me via email. Tks

    • iwansuwandy December 2, 2012 / 11:54 pm

      hallo felicia,
      for ore informations you must subscribed as my premium member via my email.an d if you done the administration fee you will get more info on CD-ROM for free related to your xianfeng cermaic collections, many info related to that ceramic,and many were reproductions vintage and new
      I am waiting for your subscribtion
      sincerely
      Dr Iwan asuwandy,MHA

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